Critical analysis of the STAPLLE behaviour support programme and comparison with the IABA framework
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Critical analysis of the STAPLLE behaviour support programme and comparison with the IABA framework

Michael Rimmington Behaviour support co-ordinator, The iMap Centre, Cheshire, Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, Lancashire

Challenging behaviour is any culturally abnormal behaviour that places the person, or others, in serious jeopardy. It is prevalent in people with cognitive impairments and can present as self-injury, aggression, destructive behaviours and wandering. The negative effects on carers who support people with challenging behaviour is well documented. This article critically analyses contemporary models of behaviour assessment and intervention, comparing the recently developed Support Training for Autistic People in Living and Learning Environments (STAPLLE) behaviour support programme and the widely implemented Institute for Applied Behaviour Analysis (IABA) framework. The use of multiple assessment processes is a vital component of the IABA framework but can be too complex for general use by families. STAPLLE’s use of specifically designed tools has been successful in helping families to reduce the occurrence of challenging behaviours. However, the toolkit’s reliance on the Motivational Assessment Scale and the parent carer’s requirement to self-assess the ABC chart data is a problem requiring further investigation and research.

Learning Disability Practice. 19, 8, 26-32. doi: 10.7748/ldp.2016.e1760

Correspondence

proact@hotmail.co.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to double-blind review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 11 April 2016

Accepted: 19 August 2016