assessing the health screening choices of women with learning disabilities
A&S Science     Next

assessing the health screening choices of women with learning disabilities

Sarah Wicks Assistant psychologist, Merton Team for People with Learning Disabilities, Sutton and Merton PCT

Women with learning disabilities have low levels of cervical screening. Sarah Wicks examines whether psychological factors play a part in influencing women’s decisions about participating in screening programmes

The health needs of people with learning disabilities are best met through promoting access to sensitive and responsive mainstream services (Ager and Littler 1998). The high rates of health problems experienced by many people with learning disabilities are exacerbated by their reduced use of general practice surgeries, preventative health screening and health promotion. Figures suggest a large unmet need for this population (Herrington et al 2005). Cervical screening is an example of a service where women in general do not adhere to screening recommendations, despite the fact that early detection improves rates of survival (Rowe et al 2005). The impetus for the current study came from a local, small-scale survey undertaken by members of the community nursing team into breast screening. The team identified that local women needed support to access mainstream screening initiatives.

Learning Disability Practice. 10, 9,10-15. doi: 10.7748/ldp2007.11.10.9.10.c6256

You need a subscription to read the full article