Why do A&E nurses fear using their advanced life support skills?
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Why do A&E nurses fear using their advanced life support skills?

Jane Lambert Resuscitation Officer
Gillian Heath A&E Sister Milton Keynes, General NHS Trust

Jane Lambert and Gillian Heath describe a study of nurses’roles in cardiac arrest situations

Cardiac arrest is the most acute medical emergency faced by medical, nursing and paramedical staff. The event is frequently unheralded and its successful management requires a team which is well rehearsed in both basic and advanced life support skills. It should be directed by a team leader trained in dealing with all the problems associated with a cardiac arrest so that the team can be managed competently and rapidly (Resuscitation Council UK 1998). Most hospitals now have at least one resuscitation officer employed to assess staff training requirements and to implement and co-ordinate training programmes in both basic and advanced life support skills.

Emergency Nurse. 8, 5, 30-32. doi: 10.7748/en2000.09.8.5.30.c1332

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