Is there a place for nebulised magnesium sulphate in the management of asthma?
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Is there a place for nebulised magnesium sulphate in the management of asthma?

Jonathan Lyons Charge nurse, emergency department/ambulatory care unit, Wishaw General Hospital, NHS Lanarkshire, Wishaw, Scotland

Intravenous magnesium sulphate (MgSO4) is an accepted part of the pharmacological management of patients with asthma. There is conflicting information, however, on whether its nebulised form is beneficial. This article describes a case study in which a patient was given intravenous MgSO4. It was suggested by a medical consultant that she could have been given nebulised MgSO4, so a literature review was undertaken to examine its efficacy. The results suggest there is no evidence to support the use of nebulised MgSO4 in the management of patients with asthma.

Emergency Nurse. 24, 7, 28-33. doi: 10.7748/en.2016.e1613

Correspondence

j.lyons1984@live.co.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 22 June 2016

Accepted: 25 August 2016

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