The provision of emergency healthcare for women who experience intimate partner violence: part 2. Strategies to address knowledge deficits and negative attitudes
Intended for healthcare professionals
Evidence and practice    

The provision of emergency healthcare for women who experience intimate partner violence: part 2. Strategies to address knowledge deficits and negative attitudes

Shannon Bakon Lecturer in Nursing, Central Queensland University, Caboolture, Queensland, Australia
Annabel Taylor Professor, Central Queensland University, Queensland, Australia
Silke Meyer Associate Professor, Monash University, School of Social Sciences, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Mark Scott Emergency Medical Consultant, Queensland Health, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Why you should read this article:
  • To understand why some healthcare professionals have a knowledge deficit relating to intimate partner violence (IPV)

  • To identify strategies to improve healthcare professionals’ knowledge of IPV

  • To recognise the potential benefits for staff and women of appointing a dedicated IPV healthcare specialist in the emergency department

The first article in this two-part series evaluated healthcare professionals’ approaches to the care of women who present to the emergency department (ED) with injuries related to intimate partner violence (IPV). It identified barriers to appropriate care provision, which included a lack of knowledge on the part of healthcare professionals and negative professional attitudes.

This second article details the findings of a literature review of three databases that aimed to evaluate strategies to address the lack of knowledge of healthcare professionals and negative attitudes concerning IPV. A total of 11 articles were included in the review. Two main strategies to address ED healthcare professionals’ knowledge deficits and negative attitudes about IPV were identified. These were developed into the themes of IPV/domestic violence specialists, and education and training.

Emergency Nurse. doi: 10.7748/en.2020.e1994

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

sbakon@usc.edu.au

Conflict of interest

None declared

Bakon S, Taylor A, Meyer S et al (2020) The provision of emergency healthcare for women who experience intimate partner violence: part 2. Strategies to address knowledge deficits and negative attitudes. Emergency Nurse. doi: 10.7748/en.2020.e1994

Published online: 26 May 2020

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