The value of anterior resection survivorship programmes
evidence and practice    

The value of anterior resection survivorship programmes

Elizabeth Clarson Bowel functional clinical nurse specialist, Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust, Sandwell Hospital, Lyndon, West Bromwich, England

Up to 80% of people with rectal cancer undergo sphincter-preserving surgery and, of these, around 90% subsequently have a change in bowel habit, ranging from increased bowel frequency to faecal incontinence or evacuatory dysfunction. The wide spectrum of symptoms after resection and reconstruction of the rectum is termed anterior resection syndrome. Many patients feel isolated by their symptoms, which can have a devastating effect on their quality of life. This article describes the development of a patient-led support group, supported by clinical nurse specialists, for people with bowel dysfunction following surgery and treatment for rectal cancer.

Cancer Nursing Practice. doi: 10.7748/cnp.2018.e1497

Citation

Clarson E (2018) The value of anterior resection survivorship programmes. Cancer Nursing Practice. doi: 10.7748/cnp.2018.e1497

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

elizabeth.clarson@nhs.net

Conflict of interest

None declared

Acknowledgements

The author would like to thank Kelly Stackhouse, lead nurse, FINCH Service, Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust, and Jodie Smith, bowel function clinical nurse specialist, FINCH Service, Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust

Published online: 04 May 2018

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