Psychological effects of choosing active surveillance on men with prostate cancer
evidence and practice    

Psychological effects of choosing active surveillance on men with prostate cancer

Nicola Lancaster Uro-oncology clinical nurse specialist, Darent Valley Hospital, Dartford and Gravesham NHS Trust, Dartford, Kent, England

Greater awareness about prostate cancer has led to an increase in early detection of organ-confined prostate cancers and, as a result, some men are diagnosed with a cancer that may not affect their mortality. These men may be given treatment options including surgery, radiotherapy or active surveillance.

Surgery and radiotherapy can have side effects, such as urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction, that may affect quality of life. Active surveillance enables urology and oncology teams to monitor the cancer and delay radical treatment until it is necessary, thereby maintaining a good quality of life. However, some men may feel anxious about the idea of not treating a cancer and opt instead for treatment.

This article examines the psychological effects of choosing active surveillance and discusses how nurses can support patients throughout the decision-making process and follow up.

Cancer Nursing Practice. doi: 10.7748/cnp.2019.e1575

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

n.lancaster@nhs.net

Conflict of interest

None declared

Lancaster N (2019) Psychological effects of choosing active surveillance on men with prostate cancer. Cancer Nursing Practice. doi: 10.7748/cnp.2019.e1575

Published online: 01 April 2019