Implementing hope-based interventions in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors
evidence and practice    

Implementing hope-based interventions in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors

Carla Berg , Professor, George Washington University, Washington DC, US
Jennifer Mascaro , Assistant professor, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, US

Why you should read this article:
  • To understand how the psychosocial sequelae associated with cancer can negatively affect the mental health and life goals of adolescent and young adult cancer survivors

  • To familiarise yourself with the concept of positive psychology and how this can support well-being

  • To enhance your knowledge of the role of hope-based interventions in enhancing quality of life in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors

In the US, the number of cancer survivors is increasing as a result of advances in treatment. The psychosocial sequelae associated with cancer and its treatment, such as depression and anxiety, can negatively affect the mental health and life goals of cancer survivors, particularly in the adolescent and young adult population. There has been a lack of research into interventions aimed at addressing the psychosocial sequelae associated with cancer in adolescents and young adults.

This article explains how the concept of hope can benefit adolescent and young adult cancer survivors because it relates to how they choose and pursue important life goals. The article also discusses how hope-based interventions can enhance psychological strengths and reduce signs and symptoms of psychopathology.

Cancer Nursing Practice. doi: 10.7748/cnp.2019.e1591

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

carlaberg@gwu.edu

Conflict of interest

None declared

Berg C, Mascaro J (2019) Implementing hope-based interventions in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors. Cancer Nursing Practice. doi: 10.7748/cnp.2019.e1591

Acknowledgement

This research was supported by Emory University’s Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta GA

Published online: 04 November 2019