The role of community nurses in preventing female genital mutilation
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The role of community nurses in preventing female genital mutilation

Niall McCrae Lecturer, mental health, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, King’s College London
Sheena Bynoe Lecturer, child health, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, King’s College London

Nurses are well placed to highlight the dangers of this harmful and illegal procedure and to work with communities and families to ensure the practice becomes unacceptable worldwide, as Niall McCrae and Sheena Bynoe explain

Female genital mutilation (FGM) has become a major issue worldwide, including the UK, where the number of women and girls affected has grown. This ritual practice is common in communities originating in parts of Africa and Asia. Although FGM is illegal and causes lasting physical and psychological harm, healthcare services have lacked a robust response until recently. Guided by government policy and clear procedures for detection and reporting, nurses have an important role in preventing FGM and in providing sensitive care for those who have undergone the procedure.

Primary Health Care. 25, 2,30-33. doi: 10.7748/phc.25.2.30.e937

Correspondence

n.mccrae@kcl.ac.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 11 July 2014

Accepted: 14 August 2014