Primary care training for adults and children with confirmed anaphylaxis requiring treatment with adrenaline
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Primary care training for adults and children with confirmed anaphylaxis requiring treatment with adrenaline

Samantha Walker Director of education and research, Education for Health, Warwick, Division of Community Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh
Jan Chantrell Respiratory nurse specialist in asthma and allergy, University Hospitals of Leicester
Sue Clarke Clinical lead, Allergy and paediatric respiratory, Education for Health, Warwick, and nurse adviser Anaphylaxis Campaign
Ruth McArthur Independent and supplementary prescriber, practice nurse with specialist interest in allergy and respiratory conditions, Macintosh Practice Hunter Health Centre East Kilbride, (Scotland) Education For Health
Celia Proudfoot Clinical nurse specialist in paediatric allergy, Countess of Chester Hospital and regional trainer for Education for Health, Warwick
June Roberts Respiratory nurse consultant, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust and NHS Salford, NHS North West and trainer for Education For Health, Warwick
Justine Allen Asthma and allergy nurse specialist, University Hospitals of Leicester

Anaphylaxis is becoming more common, and research shows that effective patient education can reduce subsequent events. There is, therefore, a growing need to train patients with confirmed anaphylaxis to avoid triggers, recognise symptoms and become confident in administering adrenaline in an emergency. As adrenaline auto-injectors are replaced in primary care, practice nurses can play an important role in educating and updating patients in anaphylaxis prevention and treatment. A best practice parameter is proposed for the key elements of training for patients with confirmed anaphylaxis requiring adrenaline treatment.

Primary Health Care. 20, 7,33-40. doi: 10.7748/phc2010.09.20.7.33.c7969