Managing pregnancy-related pelvic floor dysfunction
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Managing pregnancy-related pelvic floor dysfunction

Clair Jones Team leader and clinical physiotherapy specialist, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Norwich
Ruth Hawkes Specialist physiotherapist in women’s health based, Lincolnshire

Clair Jones and Ruth Hawkes describe how nurses can identify and support women who may be affected and outline best practice guidelines when teaching pelvic floor muscle exercises

Many women experience pelvic floor dysfunction at some time in their lives. Most commonly, it manifests as urinary incontinence but women can also be affected by anal incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse and/or sexual dysfunction. A woman is more likely to have one or more of these conditions after pregnancy and childbirth. The aim of this article is to focus on the potential problems related to pelvic floor muscle dysfunction that women may encounter after pregnancy and childbirth. The authors will explain what is considered to be good practice when teaching pelvic floor muscle exercises and provide information, which the healthcare professional can access as an additional resource to offer women seeking help and advice.

Correspondence clair.jones@nnuh.nhs.uk

Primary Health Care. 25, 1,24-28. doi: 10.7748/phc.25.1.24.e913

Received: 15 April 2014

Accepted: 17 July 2014

Published in print: 30 January 2015

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review

Conflict Of Interest

None declared