Impact of stroke: a functional, psychological report of an inner-city multiracial population
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Impact of stroke: a functional, psychological report of an inner-city multiracial population

Calvin Moorley Senior lecturer, adult nursing, Faculty of health and social care, London South Bank University
Sharon Cahill Senior lecturer, School of psychology, University East London
Aneta Tunariu Principal lecturer, School of psychology, University of East London
Oona Scott Emeritus professor for neurophysiology, School of health sport and bioscience, University of East London

Traditions, norms and values affect how stroke is perceived in different cultural populations. Calvin Moorley and colleagues describe how understanding such differences can ensure appropriate afterstroke nursing care

The provision of health services in inner cities is complex and must take account of cultural differences among populations, because a lack of awareness about these issues can affect stroke survivors. The aim of the study was to investigate the experiences of life after stroke among different racial groups in a diverse inner-city population. Data relating to functional and physical, psychological and social variables was collected from patients attending an east London outpatient clinic for one year. Understanding how stroke affects different ethnic groups can help provide appropriate stroke aftercare. Having an insight into how activities of daily living are affected in each group can enable the delivery of culturally sensitive nursing care.

Correspondence moorleyc@lsbu.ac.uk

Primary Health Care. 24, 4,26-34. doi: 10.7748/phc2014.04.24.4.26.e871

Received: 08 January 2014

Accepted: 04 March 2014

Published in print: 29 April 2014

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review

Conflict Of Interest

None declared