Using co-production in the implementation of community integrated care: a scoping review
Intended for healthcare professionals
Evidence and practice    

Using co-production in the implementation of community integrated care: a scoping review

Kirsty Marshall Senior lecturer, Integrated Care, School of Health and Society, University of Salford, Salford, England
Hayley Bamber Lecturer, Occupational Therapy, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, England

Why you should read this article:
  • To recognise co-production as an essential component of community integrated care

  • To be aware of the benefits and challenges of co-production in integrated care service design

  • To understand that practitioners need to address power dynamics among organisations, practitioners and citizens, patients and service users when implementing co-production in integrated care

The 2020 update of the Marmot report into health inequalities stated that life expectancy in England has stalled, ill health has increased and inequalities in health have widened, especially in the north of the country. Co-produced integrated care is a potential solution to fragmentation in health and social care.

This scoping review considers how co-production has been used in the implementation of integrated care. The review identified three main themes covering co-production to improve community integrated care for organisations, practitioners and patients/service users. The review concludes that co-production is desirable and potentially beneficial. When commencing co-production in integrated care, practitioners need to consider power dynamics among organisations, practitioners and citizens, patients and service users.

Primary Health Care. 32, 4, 36-42. doi: 10.7748/phc.2022.e1753

Correspondence

k.a.marshall@salford.ac.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Conflict of interest

None declared

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