Managing type 1 diabetes in school children: knowledge and attitudes of primary school teachers in Greece
Intended for healthcare professionals
Evidence and practice    

Managing type 1 diabetes in school children: knowledge and attitudes of primary school teachers in Greece

Anastasia Statiri School nurse, 5th primary school of Paleo Faliro, Athens, and PhD student, University of West Attica, Aigaleo, Greece
Venetia Notara Assistant professor, University of West Attica, Aigaleo, Greece
Constantina Skanavis Professor, University of West Attica, Aigaleo, Greece
Gavriil Karavasilis Special education teacher, PhD scholar, Hellenic Foundation for Research & Innovation, Athens, Greece

Why you should read this article:
  • To understand the role of primary school teachers in Greece in managing type 1 diabetes in school children

  • To read about a study that examined Greek primary school teachers’ knowledge of and attitudes to managing type 1 diabetes

  • To appreciate that strengthening primary school teachers’ knowledge of chronic conditions would enhance the safety, quality of life and academic achievements of school children with type 1 diabetes

Background Type 1 diabetes has negative effects on children with the condition, including reduced ability to engage in learning. Primary school teachers have an important role in supporting school children with type 1 diabetes, but the literature on teachers’ knowledge, perceptions and attitudes regarding the condition is limited.

Aim To explore the knowledge of type 1 diabetes and the perceptions of, and attitudes towards, the management of type 1 diabetes in schools among primary school teachers in Greece.

Method A cross-sectional descriptive study design was used with a sample of 157 education professionals working in primary schools in the Attica region of Greece. Data were collected via an anonymous online questionnaire.

Results One third of respondents (n=48, 31%) had insufficient knowledge of type 1 diabetes, two thirds of respondents (n=106, 68%) had basic knowledge and very few respondents (n=3, 2%) had sufficient knowledge. Respondents generally had favourable attitudes towards the management of type 1 diabetes in school. Most were in favour of the recruitment of school nurses and were interested in attending training on type 1 diabetes.

Conclusion Strengthening primary school teachers’ knowledge of chronic conditions and recruiting healthcare professionals to work in schools would likely enhance the safety, quality of life and academic achievements of school children with type 1 diabetes.

Primary Health Care. doi: 10.7748/phc.2022.e1786

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

astatiri@uniwa.gr

Conflict of interest

None declared

Statiri A, Notara V, Skanavis C et al (2022) Managing type 1 diabetes in school children: knowledge and attitudes of primary school teachers in Greece. Primary Health Care. doi: 10.7748/phc.2022.e1786

Published online: 23 November 2022

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