How to manage PVL-associated Staphylococcus aureus infections in primary care
evidence and practice    

How to manage PVL-associated Staphylococcus aureus infections in primary care

Ed Andrews Health protection practitioner, Public Health England, South London health protection team, London, England
Jane de Burgh Senior health protection practitioner, Public Health England, South London health protection team, London, England

Staphylococcus aureus is a bacterium commonly found on human skin and in the upper respiratory tract. Although it is usually harmless, some strains of Staphylococcus aureus produce a toxin known as Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) that can cause mild to severe health effects. If PVL is identified, public health action is recommended to prevent transmission. Health protection and primary care teams should work together to carry out a risk assessment and take appropriate action.

Primary Health Care. 30, 1, 28-30. doi: 10.7748/phc.2020.e1636

Correspondence

jane.deburgh@phe.gov.uk

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None declared

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