Identifying and supporting women and girls at risk of, or experiencing, violence and abuse
Intended for healthcare professionals
CPD    

Identifying and supporting women and girls at risk of, or experiencing, violence and abuse

Ruth Debra Bailey Advanced nurse practitioner, sexual health, HavensHealth, Peacehaven, East Sussex, England

Why you should read this article:
  • To enhance your understanding of various forms of violence and abuse that women and girls may experience

  • To enable you to recognise and provide appropriate support to women and girls who are at risk of, or experiencing, violence and abuse

  • To count towards revalidation as part of your 35 hours of CPD, or you may wish to write a reflective account (UK readers)

  • To contribute towards your professional development and local registration renewal requirements (non-UK readers)

Women and girls are potentially at risk of different types of violence and abuse such as sexual assault, domestic abuse, child sexual abuse, female genital mutilation and modern slavery. Nurses in primary care and community settings are well placed to identify and support women and girls at risk of, or experiencing, any such violence and abuse. It is important that nurses are aware of the risks women and girls may be exposed to, are able to recognise warning signs and know how to assess, support and safeguard patients. This article discusses common types of violence and abuse against women and girls and explains how nurses can make a difference to the lives of these women and girls through careful exploration and interventions.

Primary Health Care. 32, 6, 34-42. doi: 10.7748/phc.2022.e1765

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

@RuthRGNBrighton

Correspondence

ruth.bailey1@nhs.net

Conflict of interest

None declared

Bailey RD (2022) Identifying and supporting women and girls at risk of, or experiencing, violence and abuse. Primary Health Care. doi: 10.7748/phc.2022.e1765

Published online: 06 July 2022

Want to read more?

Already subscribed? Log in

OR

Unlock full access to RCNi Plus today

Save over 50% on your first 3 months

Your subscription package includes:
  • Unlimited online access to all 10 RCNi Journals and their archives
  • Customisable dashboard featuring 200+ topics
  • RCNi Learning featuring 180+ RCN accredited learning modules
  • RCNi Portfolio to build evidence for revalidation
  • Personalised newsletters tailored to your interests
Subscribe
RCN student member? Try Nursing Standard Student

Alternatively, you can purchase access to this article for the next seven days. Buy now

Or