Reducing burnout in nurses and care workers in secure settings
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Reducing burnout in nurses and care workers in secure settings

Warren Stewart Senior lecturer, School of Health Sciences, Brighton University, Brighton
Louise Terry Reader in Law and ethics, Faculty of Health and Social Care, London South Bank University, London

Aim To identify which educational interventions reduce burnout and promote wellbeing in nurses and care workers in secure settings.

Method A systematic review of health, educational and criminal justice literature was undertaken to appraise relevant studies and identify educational interventions that were effective in reducing burnout.

Findings There is some evidence that clinical supervision and psychological intervention training are successful in reducing burnout in nurses and care workers in secure settings.

Conclusion Supportive relationships can help nurses to manage emotional stress, and continuing personal and professional development can reduce burnout in qualified nurses in secure settings.

Nursing Standard. 28, 34,37-45. doi: 10.7748/ns2014.04.28.34.37.e8111

Received: 16 July 2013

Accepted: 05 November 2013

Published online: 23 April 2014

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review