Raising concerns and reporting poor care in practice
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Raising concerns and reporting poor care in practice

Robin Ion Senior lecturer, School of Social and Health Sciences, University of Abertay, Dundee, Scotland
Aled Jones Senior lecturer, School of Healthcare Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales
Richard Craven Lecturer, School of Social and Health Sciences, University of Abertay, Dundee, Scotland

This article considers the issue of poor care and how nurses should respond when they encounter it. Several reports and inquiries into failings in care have called into question the standards of care provided by nurses. Of equal concern is the observation that in some instances, poor care is unreported. While there may be underlying structural and organisational reasons for this, it is contended that nurses have a legal, moral and professional obligation to report poor care when they become aware of it.

Nursing Standard. 31, 15, 55-63. doi: 10.7748/ns.2016.e10665

Correspondence

R.Ion@abertay.ac.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 17 August 2016

Accepted: 05 October 2016

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