Psychological consequences of malignant melanoma: patients’ experiences and preferences
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Psychological consequences of malignant melanoma: patients’ experiences and preferences

Tracey Wheeler Junior sister and malignant melanoma support nurse, Bristol Dermatology Centre, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol

This article reports on the findings of a literature review exploring the psychological impact of malignant melanoma on patients, from diagnosis to follow up. It examines the preferences expressed by patients with regard to ongoing support from nurses in this field, and draws attention to some implications for practice. A small but significant body of literature provides information on the psychological stress experienced by patients with melanoma, and on their coping strategies. Preferences are expressed on the way that information is given at diagnosis and the support offered by the healthcare team during diagnosis and at later consultations. These preferences and experiences have implications for nurses working in cancer care in general, and skin cancer in particular.

Nursing Standard. 21, 10,42-46. doi: 10.7748/ns2006.11.21.10.42.c6380

Correspondence

tracey.wheeler@ubht.nhs.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review