Promoting awareness and practice of testicular self-examination
Art & Science Previous     Next

Promoting awareness and practice of testicular self-examination

Jo McCullagh Senior health promotion specialist, Sefton Health Improvement Support Service, Liverpool
Gareth Lewis Men’s health nurse, Sefton Health Improvement Support Service, Liverpool
Cathy Warlow Head of health improvement and partnerships, Sefton Health Improvement Support Service, Liverpool

Aim To evaluate the efficacy of a health promotion initiative on men’s knowledge of testicular cancer and self-examination rates.

Method A quasi-experimental, pre- and post-test questionnaire study of men at 14 workplace and leisure sites across two primary care trusts was undertaken: ten experimental sites received the intervention and four acted as a control. Men at all 14 sites were given a pre- and post-test questionnaire.

Results Of the 835 pre-test and 835 post-test questionnaires distributed, 518 (62.0 per cent) and 356 (42.6 per cent) were respectively returned for evaluation. In the intervention group, the median total knowledge score increased from three points (interquartile range: 2,4) at baseline to four points (interquartile range: 2,4) at post-test. However, no statistically significant change was observed in the control group. Post-intervention, the percentage of test participants examining their testicles regularly increased from 58.4 per cent to 68.3 per cent, while levels among control peers did not significantly alter.

Conclusion This evaluation highlights the potential of using a low-cost initiative which targets innovative venues to improve men’s knowledge of testicular cancer and rates of self-examination. Longer-term follow-up may be required to determine whether such increases are sustained.

Nursing Standard. 19, 51, 41-49. doi: 10.7748/ns2005.08.19.51.41.c3944

Correspondence

jo.mccullagh@southsefton-pct.nhs.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review