Person-centred communication in dementia care
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Person-centred communication in dementia care

Murna Downs Head of Bradford Dementia Group, School of Dementia Studies, University of Bradford, Bradford, England
Lindsey Collins Dementia care trainer, School of Dementia Studies, University of Bradford, Bradford, England

Communication involves the exchange of information between at least two people, a giver and a receiver. If left unaddressed, communication difficulties may have a profound effect on quality of life and quality of care. Poor communication may result in high levels of anxiety and depression for the person living with dementia. Communication breakdown contributes to high rates of depression in spouses of people living with dementia and is a major problem for family and carers. Positive and supportive communication is essential to ensure good quality dementia care. A person-centred approach focuses on supporting a person to use and retain their skills and abilities. Person-centred communication involves a commitment to including the perspective of the person living with dementia, and an understanding of who the person is, their life history and preferences.

Nursing Standard. 30, 11,37-41. doi: 10.7748/ns.30.11.37.s45

Correspondence

m.downs@bradford.ac.uk

Peer review

All articles are subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software.

Received: 20 August 2014

Accepted: 09 February 2015