Peripheral intravenous therapy: key risks and implications for practice
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Peripheral intravenous therapy: key risks and implications for practice

Paula Ingram Clinical skills co-ordinator, Practice Research Development and Education Unit, The Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh
Irene Lavery

Personnel, environment and procedures related to peripheral intravenous (IV) therapy are explained. Parenteral routes are suggested and, where peripheral IV therapy is required, recommendations are made to minimise risk of anaphylaxis and infection.

Nursing Standard. 19, 46, 55-64. doi: 10.7748/ns2005.07.19.46.55.c3923

Correspondence

irene.lavery@luht.scot.nhs.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review

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