Intravenous iron administration in a short-stay hospital setting
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Intravenous iron administration in a short-stay hospital setting

George Peebles Anaemia nurse specialist, Department of Renal Medicine, Sunderland Royal Hospital, Sunderland
Sean Fenwick Consultant nephrologist, Department of Renal Medicine, Sunderland Royal Hospital, Sunderland

Anaemia and iron deficiency are prevalent in the Western and developing world. They have implications for quality of life, prognosis and survival in a number of clinical settings. These range from the implications of anaemic status and associated outcomes in pregnancy, reduced blood transfusion requirements following surgery to lethargy and tiredness in older people if left unrecognised and untreated. Renal medicine is at the forefront of diagnosing and treating anaemia associated with chronic renal disease. In this arena the role of intravenous (IV) iron is well established. This article describes how IV iron may be given in total doses in a short-stay hospital setting.

Correspondence George.peebles@chs.northy.nhs.uk

Nursing Standard. 22, 48,35-41. doi: 10.7748/ns2008.08.22.48.35.c6635

Published in print: 06 August 2008

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review