Common psychological challenges for patients with newly acquired disability
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Common psychological challenges for patients with newly acquired disability

Stuart Larner Consultant clinical psychologist, Platt Rehabilitation Unit 2, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester

A patient’s attitude to a newly acquired disability can often be the determining factor in successful rehabilitation. This attitude is determined by his or her perceived ability to manage symptoms, deal with hospital procedures, form and maintain relationships and manage his or her feelings about the disability. Because of this complexity, psychological aspects of patient rehabilitation are often regarded as vague and difficult to negotiate. This article describes seven common psychological challenges that patients experience with a newly acquired disability or during recovery from major illness (Moos and Schaefer 1984). Strategies are outlined to assist patients to come to terms with their disability and to cope more effectively during rehabilitation.

Nursing Standard. 19, 28, 33-39. doi: 10.7748/ns2005.03.19.28.33.c3826

Correspondence

stuart.larner@mhsc.nhs.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review