The safety steps every team should take to protect lone workers
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The safety steps every team should take to protect lone workers

Erin Dean Freelance journalist

Nurses who work alone are particularly vulnerable to abuse and attacks. New guidance explains your rights to prioritise safety – even if that means withdrawal of care

Driving around looking for a safe place to park when visiting a patient’s home, or working alone in an isolated part of a big building are scenarios many nurses will recognise.

Nursing Standard. 36, 11, 14-16. doi: 10.7748/ns.36.11.14.s11

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