Academic writing: using literature to demonstrate critical analysis
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Academic writing: using literature to demonstrate critical analysis

Kathleen Duffy Senior lecturer, School of nursing, midwifery and community health, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow
Elizabeth Hastie Senior lecturer, School of nursing, midwifery and community health, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow
Jacqueline McCallum Senior lecturer, School of nursing, midwifery and community health, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow
Valerie Ness Lecturer, School of nursing, midwifery and community health, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow
Lesley Price Lecturer, School of nursing, midwifery and community health, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow

When writing at degree level, nurses need to demonstrate an understanding of evidence by summarising its key elements and comparing and contrasting authors’ views. Critical analysis is an important nursing skill in writing and in practice. With the advent of an all-degree profession, understanding how to develop this skill is crucial. This article examines how students can develop critical analysis skills to write at undergraduate degree level. It highlights some of the common errors when writing at this academic level and provides advice on how to avoid such mistakes.

Correspondence k.duffy@gcal.ac.uk

Nursing Standard. 23, 47,35-40. doi: 10.7748/ns2009.07.23.47.35.c7201

Published in print: 29 July 2009

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review