Prevention, diagnosis and treatment of venous thromboembolism
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Prevention, diagnosis and treatment of venous thromboembolism

Richard Greenall Venous thromboembolism prevention clinical nurse specialist, King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs more frequently in older people. For those nursing older people in a variety of settings, knowledge of VTE prevention, diagnosis and treatment is essential. This article discusses simple, practical measures that can be used to reduce the risk of VTE, including good hydration and promotion of mobilisation. It also discusses how a VTE forms, the signs and symptoms, and the methods used to diagnose and treat VTE. In recent years new drugs have been licensed to treat patients with VTE called direct oral anticoagulants. This article explores recent evidence and important considerations for their use in treatment of VTE.

Nursing Older People. 29, 1, 21-25. doi: 10.7748/nop.2017.e872

Correspondence

richard.greenall@nhs.net

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 23 September 2016

Accepted: 01 December 2016

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