Living well in older age: what can we learn from the Japanese experience?
evidence and practice    

Living well in older age: what can we learn from the Japanese experience?

Catharine Jenkins Senior lecturer, Birmingham City University
Carole Germaine Senior lecturer, Birmingham City University

Japan has the most aged population in the world. Not only do people live longer in Japan, they also age better. While the ageing population reflects a success story driven by lifestyle factors and health promotion initiatives, it also results in challenges for policymakers, families and older people. Other countries with ageing population profiles, such as the UK, can learn from the Japanese experience. In this article, the authors focus on the potential of health promotion strategies, social connections and technology to enhance well-being in older age.

Nursing Older People. doi: 10.7748/nop.2019.e1107

Citation

Jenkins C, Germaine C (2019) Living well in older age: what can we learn from the Japanese experience? Nursing Older People. doi: 10.7748/nop.2019.e1107

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

catharine.jenkins@bcu.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank staff at the Ageless Centre in Osaka, Satomi Beattie and Jonathan Gadsby for their support in developing this article

Published online: 22 January 2019

Want to read more?

Subscribe for unlimited access

Try 1 month’s access for just £1 and get:

Your subscription package includes:
  • Full access to the website and the online archive
  • Bi-monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal
Subscribe
Already subscribed? Log in

Alternatively, you can purchase access to this article for the next seven days. Buy now

Or