An overview of communication, movement and perception difficulties after stroke
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An overview of communication, movement and perception difficulties after stroke

Joanna Dark Speech and language therapy student, University College London
Ruth Sander Independent consultant in care of the older person

For many people who have had a stroke, weakness or paralysis on one side - hemiparesis or hemiplegia - is the most obvious symptom. However, brain damage, including stroke, can cause a range of impairments that may be less obvious but equally devastating for people and their families. This article provides an overview of communication, movement and perception difficulties, and the strategies nurses can use to help people cope with any changes to their lives.

Nursing Older People. 26, 5,32-37. doi: 10.7748/nop.26.5.32.e567

Correspondence

ruthsander8@gmail.com

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 03 February 2014

Accepted: 29 April 2014