Nutritional habits and cognitive performance of older adults
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Nutritional habits and cognitive performance of older adults

Anastasia Mallidou Assistant professor, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Mario Cartie Graduate student in the social dimensions of health, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Anastasia Mallidou and Mario Cartie look at the evidence concerning the effects of nutrition and hydration on cognition and Alzheimer’s disease in older people

Healthy nutritional habits, including drinking plenty of water and maintaining hydration, are fundamental components for sustaining life, health and wellbeing. Evidence has suggested that certain dietary patterns and lifestyles could help delay the ageing process and reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. This article explores the potential association between nutritional habits and the cognitive performance of older adults and identifies research gaps that could be filled by future studies on healthy ageing.

Nursing Management. 22, 3,27-34. doi: 10.7748/nm.22.3.27.e1331

Correspondence

mallidou@uvic.ca

Peer review

This article has been subject to double-blind review and has been checked using antiplagiarism software

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 02 December 2014

Accepted: 05 May 2015