Understanding the endocrinopathies associated with the treatment of childhood cancer: part 1
CPD Previous     Next

Understanding the endocrinopathies associated with the treatment of childhood cancer: part 1

Tanya Urquhart Macmillan clinical nurse specialist, Paediatric and teenage and young adult late effects, Sheffield Children’s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield
Jacqueline Collin Lecturer/head of department, Child and adolescent nursing, King’s College London, London

This article explores endocrinopathies associated with late effects of treatments for childhood cancers. It is the first of two articles on the subject, the second to be published in November. This is a growing area of care, as more than 80% of all childhood cancer is treatable, resulting in an increase in survivors of childhood cancer. However, up to two thirds of these children are reported to present with significant health problems resulting from their treatments, and approximately 25% of survivors have endocrine problems. This article explains how an understanding of oncology and endocrinology enables nurse specialists to educate young people about their past treatment and its implications for their health. This knowledge is the foundation for individually-tailored care plans that enable young people to be confident to self-care and self-monitor their long-term health.

Nursing Children and Young People. 28, 8,37-44. doi: 10.7748/ncyp.2016.e735

Correspondence

tanya.urquhart@sch.nhs.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to open peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Conflict of interest

None

Received: 15 November 2015

Accepted: 20 April 2016