Idiopathic scoliosis: managing pain before and after spinal surgery
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Idiopathic scoliosis: managing pain before and after spinal surgery

Lucy Bray Reader in children, young people and families, Evidence-Based Practice Research Centre, Edge Hill University and Children’s Nursing Research Unit, Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust
Jennie Craske Pain nurse specialist, Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool

Lucy Bray and Jennie Craske present a study into the information that young people need to be given about pain when undergoing surgery to correct spinal curvature

Idiopathic scoliosis surgery is performed to correct a curvature of the spine. This is a painful surgical procedure which is carried out on otherwise healthy young people. This article reports on a small evaluation project which focused on young people’s opinions and experiences of their pain information needs, pain management and pain assessment. Nine young people completed written activity sheets before and after scoliosis surgery. Most of the information provided on the activity sheets involved positive comments about the surgical experience although some indicated that the management of pain continued to be a challenge after spinal surgery. The project has highlighted that there is more work to be done to ensure that young people are prepared for surgery and they are helped to convey their experiences of pain to health professionals during their treatment and recovery.

Nursing Children and Young People. 27, 10,22-25. doi: 10.7748/ncyp.27.10.22.s26

Correspondence

brayl@edgehill.ac.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to open peer review and checked using antiplagiarism software

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 03 March 2015

Accepted: 05 August 2015