Evidence-based thermal care of low birthweight neonates. Part two: family-centred care principles
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Evidence-based thermal care of low birthweight neonates. Part two: family-centred care principles

Victoria Turnbull Staff nurse, Barnet Hospital, London
Julia Petty Senior lecturer, Children’s nursing, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield

In the second of a two-part article on the importance of thermal care in premature babies, Victoria Turnbull and Julia Petty consider separation issues

Parents should be involved in the care of, and decision making for, their newborn, and separations should be minimised. Their needs should be anticipated, respected and catered for in the neonatal unit. Open, clear, consistent information and communication should be maintained. Recommended facilities include accommodation and equipment for expressing breast milk, 24-hour visiting, psychological support services and maximised opportunities for parents to provide positive, gentle touch and skin-to-skin contact with their child during the admission.

Nursing Children and Young People. 25, 3, 26-29. doi: 10.7748/ncyp2013.04.25.3.26.e172

Correspondence

victoria.steele@nhs.net

Peer review

This article has been subject to open peer review

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 03 March 2012

Accepted: 03 August 2012

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