Addressing the psychosocial needs of young people with thalassaemia undergoing bone marrow transplantation
evidence and practice    

Addressing the psychosocial needs of young people with thalassaemia undergoing bone marrow transplantation

Louise Fyfe-Taylor Children’s Nursing Student, King’s College London, London, England
Andrea Cockett Associate Dean, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Palliative Care, King’s College London, London, England

Why you should read this article:
  • To understand the psychosocial issues experienced by young people with thalassaemia undergoing bone marrow transplantation

  • To acknowledge the benefits of involving young people with thalassaemia in decision-making

  • To recognise the importance of combining communication skills and clinical competence in thalassaemia care

Beta thalassaemia major is an inherited condition that causes severe anaemia. Patients with the condition require regular blood transfusions. One curative treatment option available is bone marrow transplantation, but a bone marrow transplant is a high-risk, painful procedure requiring prolonged hospitalisation. Undergoing such a disruptive treatment can be a source of great anxiety for young people and their families, who will need honest, sensitive and empathetic communication, person-centred care, support to socialise and access education, involvement in decision-making and signposting to financial support. This article discusses the role of children’s nurses in addressing the psychosocial needs of young people with thalassaemia who undergo bone marrow transplantation and in supporting young people’s families.

Nursing Children and Young People. doi: 10.7748/ncyp.2020.e1300

Peer review

This article has been subject to open peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

@AndreaCockett

Correspondence

andrea.cockett@kcl.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Fyfe-Taylor L, Cockett A (2020) Addressing the psychosocial needs of young people with thalassaemia undergoing bone marrow transplantation. Nursing Children and Young People. doi: 10.7748/ncyp.2020.e1300

Published online: 14 December 2020

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