Using social exchange theory to guide successful study recruitment and retention
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Using social exchange theory to guide successful study recruitment and retention

Lisa McGregor Research assistant, Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Canada
Karen Parker Master’s degree student, Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Canada
Pamela LeBlanc Research co-ordinator, Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Canada
Kathryn M King Professor and heritage scholar, Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Canada

Social exchange theory can be used to reduce participant attrition during studies, as Lisa McGregor, Karen Parker, Pamela LeBlanc and Kathryn M King explain

Participant attrition (withdrawal or loss after entering a study) is a major threat to the completion of valid studies. It can result in systematic error (selection bias), thus decreasing the statistical power of studies and limiting the general-isability of study findings. This paper demonstrates how key social exchange theory principles form the theoretical context for our practice, which, in turn enables us to form enduring relationships with study participants.

Nurse Researcher. 17, 2, 74-82. doi: 10.7748/nr2010.01.17.2.74.c7464

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