Methodological challenges in intervention studies
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Methodological challenges in intervention studies

Brian Porter Fellow in allergy and immunology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, US
Luz Porter Professor and coordinator of the PhD in Nursing Program, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Florida International University, US
Virginia McCoy Professor and chair, Department of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Stempel School of Public Health, College of Health and Urban Affairs, Florida International University, US
Mayra Lima Family nurse practitioner, Memorial Hospital Health Systems, Hollywood, Florida, US
Clare Pryce Family nurse practitioner, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Florida International University, US
Sachin Nunnewar Research assistant , College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Florida International University and Stempel School of Public Health, College of Health and Urban Affairs, Florida International University, US

Parental substance abuse is a risk factor for child maltreatment, neglect and multi-generational drug abuse. Developing efficacious, cost-efficient interventions is critical to addressing this growing problem. This article by Brian Porter, Luz Porter, Virginia McCoy, Mayra Lima, Clare Pryce and Sachin Nunnewar highlights lessons learned during the first year of a study based in Florida to evaluate a novel parenting intervention targeting substance-abusing mothers and their babies

Drug abuse rehabilitation, characterised by high recidivism and difficult-to-access populations, is one of the greatest challenges of modern health care. The estimated annual costs of substance abuse treatment, its co-morbidities and complications were upwards of $300 billion in 1995 (US Department of Health and Human Services 2001). The impact of substance abuse reaches all layers of society, significantly correlating with homelessness, physical abuse and a myriad of psychiatric illnesses, including chronic depression (Palacios et al 1999). Parental substance abuse, in particular, is a known risk factor for child maltreatment and neglect, as well as subsequent drug abuse in the children of substance-abusing parents (Millar and Stermac 2000, Stein et al 2002). In turn, effective treatment necessitates that rehabilitation programmes account for the sociocultural context of clients, their families and the surrounding community (Gabriel 1997, Yin and Kaftarian 1997, Chan et al 2004, Devieux et al 2005, Fisher and Ball 2005, Pantin et al 2005).

Nurse Researcher. 16, 2, 43-63. doi: 10.7748/nr2009.01.16.2.43.c6761

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