Lessons learned from conducting qualitative research in a hospital
Barriers Previous     Next

Lessons learned from conducting qualitative research in a hospital

Wendy Mann Woith Associate professor, Mennonite College of Nursing Illinois State University, Normal, llinois, US
Sheryl Henry Jenkins Associate professor, Mennonite College of Nursing Illinois State University, Normal, llinois, US
Kim Schafer Astroth Assistant professor, Mennonite College of Nursing Illinois State University, Normal, llinois, US
Julie A Kennedy PhD student, Illinois State University, Normal, llinois, US

Aim To examine unexpected barriers to the conduct of hospital research during a study of nurses’ activation of rapid response teams.

Background We interviewed hospital nurses regarding their decisions to activate rapid response teams and encountered unexpected barriers to the conduct of this study in the hospital setting.

Data sources Experience of conducting qualitative research with bedside nurses in a community hospital.

Review methods Review of the reports of others who have conducted hospital research.

Discussion Barriers related to administrative support, environmental distractors, constraints on nurses’ time, apparent lack of investment in research by staff and a cumbersome recruitment process are identified. Recommendations on study site selection, timing of research, gaining access to nurses, scheduling and conducting interviews, and transcribing recorded data are made.

Conclusion As evidence is necessary to deliver safe, quality care, it is important that nurses understand and participate in research. This participation involves not only conducting research, but also serving as subjects. Given the importance of bedside nurses’ willingness to engage in research, it is crucial to understand factors that impede or assist their participation.

Implications for research/practice We offer several recommendations to nurses conducting research in hospitals, including:

Seek hospitals that are supportive of research, yet not over-invested in the process.

Build extra time into data collection schedules to maximize flexibility and accommodate work-place demands.

Emphasise the relevance and benefits of the research to nurses.

Nurse Researcher. 22, 2, 40-43. doi: 10.7748/nr.22.2.40.e1280

Correspondence

wlwoith@ilstu.edu

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 09 September 2013

Accepted: 12 October 2013

Want to read more?

Subscribe for unlimited access

Try 1 month’s access for just £1 and get:

Your subscription package includes:
  • Full access to the website and the online archive
  • Quaterly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal
Subscribe
Already subscribed? Log in

Alternatively, you can purchase access to this article for the next seven days. Buy now

Or