Developing and testing attitude scales around IT
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Developing and testing attitude scales around IT

Rod Ward Senior lecturer, Faculty of Health and Social Care, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK
Margaret Glogowska Senior lecturer, Faculty of Health and Social Care, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK
Katherine Pollard Research fellow, Faculty of Health and Social Care, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK
Pam Moule Reader in nursing and learning technologies, Faculty of Health and Social Care, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK

Rod Ward, Margaret Glogowska, Katherine Pollard and Pam Moule describe how they developed and analysed data from a survey of healthcare professionals

Information technology (IT) is an integral component of the healthcare delivery arsenal. However, not all professionals are happy or comfortable with such technology. To assess professionals’ attitudes to IT-use in the workplace, a new questionnaire, the Information Technology Attitude Scales for Health (ITASH), which comprises three scales that can be used to measure the attitudes of UK health professionals, has been developed. Here, the authors describe existing scales, why a new scale was required, and how analysing data from a questionnaire using exploratory factor analysis determined the components of the three scales: efficiency of care; education, training and development; and control.

Nurse Researcher. 17, 1, 77-87. doi: 10.7748/nr2009.10.17.1.77.c7343

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