Self-efficacy and job satisfaction in nurses who care for mentally disordered offenders
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Self-efficacy and job satisfaction in nurses who care for mentally disordered offenders

Matthew Reid Staff nurse, NHS Ayrshire and Arran, Community forensic mental health team and the forensic in-patient service

Matthew Reid analyses the relationship between these two complex concepts, and the possible implications this may have for practice

The relationship between self-efficacy and job satisfaction is multifaceted. Nurses might have concerns about managing their workload, which can trigger the stress and agitation that often exacerbate the situation. In this study the job satisfaction and motivation of 69 nurses, who have experience of working with mentally disordered offenders in a demanding multicultural environment, are explored. Participants were surveyed for age, duration and area of service, salary position and ways of organising their workload, and asked to complete questionnaires from approved psychometric scales. Correlations between job satisfaction and self-efficacy were found to be statistically significant and clearly affect productivity and quality of work. Managers should consider the benefits of improved staff training, support and working conditions.

Mental Health Practice. 18, 4, 29-36. doi: 10.7748/mhp.18.4.29.e952

Correspondence

matthew.reid@aapct.scot.nhs.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 10 November 2013

Accepted: 21 January 2014