Research-active nurses: the myths, fears and potential
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Research-active nurses: the myths, fears and potential

Alison Jane Welfare-Wilson Specialist care co-ordinator, Early Intervention for Psychosis Service of Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust
Amanda Scrivener Consultant clinical psychologist, Early Intervention for Psychosis Service of Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust

Alison Jane Welfare-Wilson and Amanda Scrivener reflect on the barriers that initially deterred them from engaging in clinical studies, and what has been done at their trust to encourage more colleagues to get involved

For nursing to progress, it needs to be continuously examined by practising staff through evidence-based research. Those involved in such research benefit from their own increasing interest, confidence and sense of achievement, as well as from possible improvements in their work and that of their colleagues.

Two clinicians working in a mental health trust established a research group to encourage appropriate studies and link with other investigators, but only one nurse participated. Individual and organisational barriers to nursing staff undertaking research in their practice were found to include lack of training, confidence, time and managerial support. These obstacles should be addressed by pre- and post-qualification training, and management should actively promote research by contributing funds and resources for approved projects, as well as support and dedicated time.

Mental Health Practice. 18, 10,27-31. doi: 10.7748/mhp.18.10.27.e970

Correspondence

alison.welfare-wilson@kmpt.nhs.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to double-blind review and has been checked using antiplagiarism software

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 21 January 2014

Accepted: 04 July 2014