Parental mental illness: incidence, assessment and practice
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Parental mental illness: incidence, assessment and practice

Lina Gatsou Honorary professor, De Montfort University, Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust
Scott Yates Reader in psychosocial studies, De Montfort University
Shahid Hussain Trainee psychiatrist, Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust
Mary Barrett Consultant psychiatrist, Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust
Shweta Gangavati Trainee psychiatrist, Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust
Rahat Ghafoor Consultant in child and adolescent psychiatry, Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust

Lina Gatsou and colleagues report on an audit that highlights a gap in services for children and families with a parent who has a mental illness

Parental mental illness is a risk factor for a range of negative experiences for children and young people. Evidence shows that it affects, and is affected by, family contexts, and whole-family involvement in treatment can be beneficial. However, UK mental health services have been criticised for their response to parental mental illness, and little is known about assessment and practice in areas where support is available. This article presents results from an audit of mental health services in one English region. Results indicate that there is a high prevalence of parental mental illness, but that assessment of cases and provision of appropriate family support are inconsistent.

Mental Health Practice. 19, 5,25-27. doi: 10.7748/mhp.19.5.25.s18

Correspondence

syates@dmu.ac.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to double-blind review and has been checked using antiplagiarism software

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 30 April 2015

Accepted: 16 September 2015