Incident reporting to improve clinical practice in a medium-secure setting
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Incident reporting to improve clinical practice in a medium-secure setting

Mike Sullivan Service manager, The Caswell Clinic, Glanrhyd Hospital, Bridgend, Wales
Peter Ghroum Lecturer practitioner in forensic nursing, The Caswell Clinic, Glanrhyd Hospital, Bridgend, Wales

Assessing when acts of violence and self-harm were likely to occur enabled one clinic to deploy staff more effectively, say Mike Sullivan and Peter Ghroum

Analysis of the distribution and frequency of episodes of violence/aggression and deliberate self-harm in a medium-secure unit shows that there are peak times for such occurrences and destabilising conditions that may precipitate these behaviours. Adjusting staffing levels and shift patterns, and providing individualised observation plans reduces the number of incidents. Flexibility and responsiveness are important at all times.

Mental Health Practice. 16, 7, 16-20. doi: 10.7748/mhp2013.04.16.7.16.e856

Correspondence

peter.ghroum@wales.nhs.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 16 July 2012

Accepted: 24 October 2012

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