Improving patient safety and quality of care for patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy
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Improving patient safety and quality of care for patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy

Stephen Kelly ECT co-ordinator/clinical manager, Greater Glasgow and Clyde ECT Suite
Linda Kelly Lecturer in adult health, University of the West of Scotland, Hamilton

Stephen Kelly and Linda Kelly show how staff providing this controversial treatment created a service that is regarded as a benchmark of excellence at a hospital in Scotland

A variety of psychiatric disorders have been treated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) since the late 1930s, but myths and misconceptions held by the general public, clinicians, and patients about it have continued ever since. In many psychiatric hospitals the departments delivering ECT have been underfunded and have a low profile. This article explains how support and funding was acquired to develop an ECT service that has improved patient care and safety. This development has also raised the profile of this often-controversial treatment in the local health board.

Mental Health Practice. 17, 5, 35-39. doi: 10.7748/mhp2014.02.17.5.35.e853

Correspondence

stephen.kelly@ggc.scot.nhs.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 10 February 2013

Accepted: 04 March 2013

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