Restrictive interventions: a service evaluation
evidence and practice    

Restrictive interventions: a service evaluation

Sheryl Parke Psychology assistant, Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust, Norwich, England
Lucy Hunn Psychology assistant, Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust, Norwich, England
Tracey Holland Professional lead for reducing restrictive interventions, Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust, Norwich, England
Lulu Preston Consultant psychologist, Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust, Norwich, England
Louise McCarthy Lead research nurse, research and development, Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust, Norwich, England
Matthew Day Prevention and management of aggression practitioner, Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Trust, Norwich, England

Background Restrictive interventions (RIs) are defined as the use of deliberate acts that restrict a person’s movement, liberty or freedom to act independently. RIs such as seclusion and physical intervention are practices commonly used to manage violence and aggression.

Aims To investigate the frequency and rationale for use of RIs at an NHS inpatient service.

Methods A service evaluation was carried out for six inpatient wards that offer adult and later-life services. Data were collected from patient incident and adverse events reports and from electronic patient records.

Results There were 424 incidents of physical intervention and 184 incidents of seclusion reported. The use of physical intervention was more frequent between 10am and 12pm, when personal care was carried out. Physical and non-physical assaults were most commonly reported as the reasons for use of RIs.

Conclusion Analysing the frequency and the rationale for the use of RIs has enabled changes to be made to practice and how staff are trained. It is hoped that other services will reflect on their use of RIs to improve practice.

Mental Health Practice. doi: 10.7748/mhp.2019.e1369

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

tracey.holland@nsft.nhs.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Parke S, Hunn L, Holland T et al (2019) Restrictive interventions: a service evaluation. Mental Health Practice. doi: 10.7748/mhp.2019.e1369

Published online: 13 August 2019