Attitudes towards going smoke-free at an inpatient recovery unit
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Attitudes towards going smoke-free at an inpatient recovery unit

Claudia Calciu Staff grade doctor, rehabilitation psychiatry, 2gether NHS Foundation Trust, Gloucestershire, England
Rabia Khan Third year psychiatry core trainee, 2gether NHS Foundation Trust, Gloucestershire, England
Rob Macpherson Consultant rehabilitation psychiatrist, 2gether NHS Foundation Trust, Gloucestershire, England
Charles Garton Deputy manager, Honeybourne Recovery Unit, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England
Linda Durrant Occupational therapist, Honeybourne Recovery Unit, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England
Rachel Jackson Clinical mental health pharmacist, Gloucestershire Royal Hospital, Gloucestershire, England
Helen Elliot Matron, learning disability and recovery service, 2gether NHS Foundation Trust, Gloucestershire, England

Background Current national policy in the UK is to make all psychiatric inpatient areas non-smoking by the end of 2018.

Methods A mixed qualitative approach, using a survey with a semi-structured format and a World Café method.

Discussion This pilot project explored views and experiences of staff and patients in making an inpatient recovery unit a smoke-free zone. A number of issues that were causing anxiety in patients and staff members were identified.

Conclusion The focus group generated a number of possible interventions which may help to achieve a smoke-free environment while supporting inpatients who are giving up smoking.

Mental Health Practice. 20, 5, 17-22. doi: 10.7748/mhp.2017.e1141

Correspondence

claudia.calciu@nhs.net

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 25 November 2015

Accepted: 09 May 2016