Acute inpatient care in the UK. Part 1: recovery-oriented wards
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Acute inpatient care in the UK. Part 1: recovery-oriented wards

John Baker Senior lecturer,, University of Manchester, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work
Ana Sanderson Works as senior mental health nurse, mental health liaison team, Accident and Emergency Department, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester
Katharine Challen Nursing student, University of Manchester
Owen Price PhD student, University of Manchester

In the first of two articles, John Baker and colleagues examine the evidence to discover what changes to culture, processes and approach are effective in improving services

Service users, staff and carers have long expressed dissatisfaction with the quality of acute mental health inpatient care, particularly with perceived staff inaccessibility and poor environments.

Recovery-orientated organisational policies and staff training and practice have been shown to improve the situation. These have centred on integration with other services and collaboration with service users and their families. Whereas on wards, good risk management, therapeutic relationships, meaningful activities, attention to physical health and social inclusion all promote recovery and are cost-effective.

Mental Health Practice. 17, 10, 18-24. doi: 10.7748/mhp.17.10.18.e883

Correspondence

John.baker@manchester.ac.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 03 May 2013

Accepted: 04 December 2013