‘Too young to die!’ A cognitive behavioural approach to dealing with ‘death anxiety’
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‘Too young to die!’ A cognitive behavioural approach to dealing with ‘death anxiety’

Rob Mirow Acting lead community nurse, specialist practitioner, counsellor, Psychotherapist with the CLDT, Trafford Primary Care Trust

Obsessive and irrational thoughts about dying were ruining the quality of life for a man with learning disabilities. But, by providing this client with a safe and therapeutic relationship, Rob Mirow helped him to relax and enjoy much-loved activities once again

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is seen as a therapy of choice, with a successful evidence base for anxiety, depression, obsessions, post-traumatic stress, dealing with anger, problem solving and relationship difficulties (for example, National Institue for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) 2004, 2007). CBT can be applied to people with learning disabilities, especially where a more structured format is needed for those on the autistic spectrum or those who have problems in understanding and linking things together (Kroese et al 1997).

Learning Disability Practice. 11, 7,18-21. doi: 10.7748/ldp2008.09.11.7.18.c6687

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