Risk assessment and the use of restrictive physical intervention in adults with a learning disability
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Risk assessment and the use of restrictive physical intervention in adults with a learning disability

David William Perry Consultant Psychiatrist, Gulson Hospital, Coventry Primary Care NHS Trust
Gareth White Nursing team, Whitefriars Lodge, Coventry
Garry Norman Director, Response Options Ltd, Warwickshire
Geoff Marston Consultant Psychiatrist, Gulson Hospital, Coventry Primary Care NHS Trust
Raj Auchoybur Practice Educator, Gulson Hospital, Coventry Primary Care NHS Trust

There are specific risks to consider when people with learning disability are physically restrained. David Perry and colleagues outline the safeguards that are recommended if intervention becomes necessary

Using physical interventions to restrict people with learning disabilities has always been a controversial issue. The Department of Health (DH) publication Guidance for Restrictive Physical Interventions (DH 2002), produced as part of the Valuing People White Paper (DH 2001a), acknowledged that such interventions might be appropriate under certain circumstances. Examples include preventing acts of physical violence or severe self-injurious behaviour, while stopping the perpetration of a serious criminal act was another. The guidance emphasised, however, that physical interventions should be used as a last resort and when less aver-sive techniques such as de-escalation had been attempted first.

Learning Disability Practice. 9, 6,30-36. doi: 10.7748/ldp2006.07.9.6.30.c7663

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