Promoting the independence of people with intellectual disabilities
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Promoting the independence of people with intellectual disabilities

John Aldridge Senior lecturer in nursing (learning disabilities), University of Northampton

Here we explore the enormous implications that independence has for people with intellectual disabilities. After completing the activities, readers will be able to empathise with a client’s situation, appreciate the importance of continuous person-centred assessment in the promotion of independence, understand how barriers to the acquisition of necessary skills may be overcome, and balance potential risks against benefits. Clients’ independence needs to be a major part of the vision and practice of nurses working for people with intellectual disabilities.

Learning Disability Practice. 13, 9,31-36. doi: 10.7748/ldp2010.11.13.9.31.c8097