personal outcomes for people with learning disabilities incorporating the concept of collaboration: Part 1
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personal outcomes for people with learning disabilities incorporating the concept of collaboration: Part 1

Leonard Callaghan Learning Disability Nurse, Republic of Ireland

In part one of a two-part article, Leonard Callaghan explores the concept of collaboration in relation to achieving better quality care for clients

Healthcare provision is constantly responding to changes in technology, demographics, politics, consumer knowledge and economics (Porter-O’Grady 2003, Sofarelli and Brown 1998). Increasing litigation surrounding the right to health care (Kearney 2004, Wren 2003), coupled with demands for a more efficient and effective health service (Doran 2003, Ham 2003) add to this ever-changing picture. Evidence of change has also come from the expanding roles of nurses from the report of the Commission on Nursing (Government of Ireland 1998) and the proposed Irish health reforms, which require nursing and other healthcare professionals to examine new ways of delivering high quality care to patients (Kelly 2003).

Learning Disability Practice. 8, 8, 12-16. doi: 10.7748/ldp2005.10.8.8.12.c1640

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